close

You are logged in as

Logout

This website uses cookies to distinguish you from other users. This helps us to provide you with a good user experience and also allows us to improve our website. More information

Facebook Old Cols College

From the Rector

Regulus Address // Issue 3 // November 2022

More news for Rector

Recently I had the privilege of attending a university ceremony where our son graduated with an MSc in Engineering Geology. This qualification was completed in his late 20s while working full‑time – a promising commitment to lifelong learning. Like many St Andrew’s College parents I wondered where the last 12 years had gone and felt grateful for the preparation he had at St Andrew’s to flourish in life beyond school.

It led me to reflect upon the hundreds of graduates and the various worlds of work and influence they will be heading to. What attributes will make them valuable employees? What kind of roles will give them a sense of fulfilment and satisfaction? What kind of impact will they make on the world? What values will determine the choices they make throughout the coming years? Most of the graduates I witnessed were It led me to reflect upon the hundreds of graduates and the various worlds of work and influence they will be heading to. What attributes will make them valuable employees? What kind of roles will give them a sense of fulfilment and satisfaction? What kind of impact will they make on the world? What values will determine the choices they make throughout the coming years? Most of the graduates I witnessed were 4–6 years post compulsory education and as holders now of undergraduate (or possibly post-graduate) qualifications, they represent around 30 per cent of the New Zealand population. There is no doubt they will be moving into careers that will shape a world with new and different challenges. It is my expectation they will enter this world armed not only with considerable knowledge from their degree and skills in problem‑solving, collaboration, connection, and creativity, but also with the attributes of compassion, gratitude, integrity and humility.

Gen Z are young people born between 1997 and 2012 (now aged 10–25 years) many of whom are now entering the workforce. They include the school leavers of 2017 – our St Andrew’s College centenary year, and five years out they are making their mark. Recently, I met up with two Gen Z former students, Lizzie Stevenson and Angus Syme, Head Prefects of 2017. Both came to our recent 30 years of Co-ed celebration. Lizzie is in her fifth year studying Medicine at Otago Medical School, and Angus, after completing a finance degree at Otago, is co-founder of The Flatpack Company which has been highly successful in New Zealand and is now looking to expand internationally. Lizzie and Angus are of course but two of our school leavers over the last five years who number around 1000. I feel privileged to remain connected with many students beyond school through regional or alumni events, Old Collegian gatherings or chance encounters. It is always inspiring to see where and how our Old Collegians are forging their way in the world, whatever pathway they have chosen beyond school. What impressed me about Lizzie and Angus is that they wanted to come back to our co-education celebration. They still felt connected to their school, were grateful for the opportunities they enjoyed at St Andrew’s, and mixed easily and graciously with other Old Collegians from many different year groups.

There are many unknowns about the world and society for the current Gen Z group. They certainly understand the need to look after the planet and protect it from the effects of climate change and practices that threaten sustainability. They are making personal choices about consumption, food production, travel, work life balance, equitable outcomes, and mental health – all of which will have significant impact on the quality of life for future generations. There are many unknowns about the world and society for the current Gen Z group. They certainly understand the need to look after the planet and protect it from the effects of climate change and practices that threaten sustainability. They are making personal choices about consumption, food production, travel, work life balance, equitable outcomes, and mental health – all of which will have significant impact on the quality of life for future generations. After Gen Z comes Generation Alpha – born 2013–2024 who are likely to be looking for jobs such as UX Manager, blockchain developer, data designer, sleep technician, sustainability officer, urban farmer, or even life simplifier! The Gen A children are in our primary schools now and schools, as always, are at the front line of a bombardment of influences from technology, social media and societal expectations.

In the management of this constant change, it is very clear to me that, just like the generations of educators before us, it is our responsibility to prepare students for the world they are inheriting. High on the agenda right now is the importance of well-being for all, discernment in the use of social media, recognising the difference between reality and disinformation, and the role of social responsibility with regards to equality, opportunity and sustainability. We also recognise the call for Aotearoa to embrace diversity and inclusivity, to understand and respect Te Tiriti o Waitangi and Mana Ōrite. As the world becomes more technological, the skills of communication, creativity and collaboration, plus the ability to lead and work effectively in teams will also be critical to personal and In the management of this constant change, it is very clear to me that, just like the generations of educators before us, it is our responsibility to prepare students for the world they are inheriting. High on the agenda right now is the importance of well-being for all, discernment in the use of social media, recognising the difference between reality and disinformation, and the role of social responsibility with regards to equality, opportunity and sustainability. We also recognise the call for Aotearoa to embrace diversity and inclusivity, to understand and respect Te Tiriti o Waitangi and Mana Ōrite. As the world becomes more technological, the skills of communication, creativity and collaboration, plus the ability to lead and work effectively in teams will also be critical to personal and professional development.

As always, the importance is balance: tradition and innovation, literacy and technology, individual rights and collective responsibility, historical perspective and future possibilities. While many educators who are already in the workforce, view the future as challenging, today’s students have grown up in a world that has shaped and prepared them for it. But today’s students and tomorrow’s leaders need clarity and guidance from those they look up to. The quality relationships between students and teachers, ākonga and Kaiako, are more critical than ever. Mutually respectful relationships are a hallmark of a St Andrew’s education and I am forever grateful for the professional and genuine care our staff at the College extend to students. As we prepare to farewell our St Andrew’s leavers at the end of this year, I feel confident the opportunities and experiences, values and relationships, successes and challenges they have enjoyed during their time at St Andrew’s, have set them up for the next phase of learning and contributing. They will be equipped to lead the way for Generation Alpha who come after them.

Explosion of Success in Term 3

As we headed into the final term for 2022, I reflected upon the unprecedented success of a number of students throughout Term 3 across academic, sporting and cultural activities. It seems as though the restrictions of the last two-and-a-half years have driven our students to reach for the stars and believe in extraordinary possibilities. Our students have achieved national and international recognition in everything from Mathematics, poetry, basketball, hockey, football, equestrian, fencing, and karate, to songwriting, chamber music, classical music, choir, and rock band. Many St Andrew’s students have also represented New Zealand in a range of academic, cultural and sporting pursuits. These achievements are highlighted in this issue of Regulus, through individual stories, the Top Student Successes on page 41, and the list of New Zealand representatives on page 43. We are extremely proud of the incredible dedication and successes of our students in 2022, the passion and pride they have shown in representing St Andrew’s, and the way they have conducted themselves outside the College gates.

Christine Leighton
Rector

The Rector's Address from the third edition of Regulus for 2022.

Post your comment

Comments

No one has commented on this page yet.